Podcast: Countering violent extremism

The Christchurch attacks, radicalisation, and the role of social and mainstream media

Jacinta Carroll, Caroline Fisher, Anooshe Mushtaq, Mathieu O'Neil, Sharon Bessell

PHOTO: AAP

Government and governance, National security, Arts, culture & society | Australia, Asia, East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, The Pacific, The World

29 March 2019

This week on Policy Forum Pod we take a look at countering violent extremism policies and whether policymakers have a blind spot when it comes to right-wing extremism. The panel also discuss how the mainstream media reports deadly attacks and whether the social media giants are pulling their weight in preventing violent content spreading.

The devastating attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand shocked the world and claimed the lives of 50 people. In response, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern rushed through a new firearms policy and openly showed her solidarity with the Muslim community. Social media companies, however, were criticised for a sluggish response in removing footage of the attacks and questions have been asked about how the mainstream media covered the terrible events. This week our expert panel – Jacinta Carroll, Anooshe Mushtaq, Caroline Fisher, and Mathieu O’Neil – take a look at Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) policies, pathways to radicalisation, and the role of mainstream and social media. Listen here: https://simplecast.com/s/5cd369bb

Our presenters Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce also take a look at the Al Jazeera’s undercover investigation into One Nation, and an historic week in the “slow-motion car crash” that is Brexit. They also tackle some suggestions for future pods from new members of our Policy Forum Pod Facebook group, and ask for your help in our upcoming 100th episode of the pod.

This episode’s panel consists of:

Jacinta Carroll is the Director of National Security Policy at the ANU National Security College. She was previously the inaugural Head of ASPI’s Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre.

Mathieu O’Neil is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra and an Adjunct Research Fellow at the ANU School of Sociology.

Anooshe Mushtaq is the founder and Chair of the Raqib Taskforce, a Muslim-led organisation that builds social inclusion through engagement across the Australian community to dispel extremist messages.

Caroline Fisher is an Assistant Professor in journalism at the University of Canberra. She is a member of the News & Media Research Centre and co-author of the annual Digital News Report – Australia.

Our presenters this episode are:

Sharon Bessell is the Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show Notes | The following referred to in this episode:

To rate Policy Forum on iTunes

Al Jazeera documentary on James Ashby and Steve Dixon

Brexit: British Parliament’s indicative votes

More than one million marchers in London

Petition to revoke Article 50 in UK

Student climate strike

The Familiar Strange podcast

Jacinda Ardern’s response to Christchurch attack

Fraser Anning’s comments on Christchurch attack

Why women adopt Jihadi ideology – Anooshe Mushtaq

Movie: BlacKkKlansman

Michael Pezzullo’s seven greatest threats to Australia’s national security

Jacinta’s comments to SBS on $900,000 funding

Pauline Hanson: “Islam is a disease”

Scott Morrison: “violent, extremist Islam”

‘Egg boy’ attacked by Fraser Anning

Melbourne’s Bourke Street attack

Media Watch episode ‘Anti-Islam rhetoric’

New Zealand bans Christchurch suspect’s manifesto – Damien Cave in The New York Times

Text of Unabomber manifesto in The New York Times

Master of Security Policy (National Security College)

The National Security Podcast

To read the transcript of the podcast, click here.

Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunesSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

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